Homage to Paganini

National Concert Hall

22 February 2019

Pavel Steidl

After winning first prize at the 1982 International Guitar Competition of Radio France in Paris, Steidl began his career as a professional music

After winning first prize at the 1982 International Guitar Competition of Radio France in Paris, Steidl began his career as a professional musician.

“Here was a guitarist who knew how to laugh with the music and share the joke with his audience. But behind the entertainer lies a serious artist, whose extended composition in memory of Jana Obrovska proved fully capable of stirring emotions at the other end of the scale. Never was a standing ovation more richly deserved. Pavel Steidl had won the hearts and minds of a capacity crowd.” (Classical guitar magazine)

Since he won first prize at the Radio France International Competition in Paris in 1982, he has become one of the most widely celebrated soloists of his generation. Among the members of the jury were such artists as Alexandre Tansman, Antonio Lauro and Maria Luisa Anido.

Before that he studied with such guitarist as Milan Zelenka and Štěpán Rak in Prague. In 1987 he decided to emigrate to the Netherlands where after years of studying and getting inspiration from many different artists he has created his own style which is not ignoring authentic way of interpretation 19th-century guitar literature on periodic instruments and going far to some world music elements. Pavel Steidl also composes himself and his own compositions are often played on his concerts. He played in more than 40 countries of the world from among Canada, USA, China, India, Japan, Europe, South and Central America and many others. On demand of Italian Guitar Magazine Guitart the readers decided to choose him as a guitar player of the year 2004 . Pavel Steidl plays many instruments, but mainly Francisco Simplicio (1926) and Franz Butcher (2008), romantic guitar: copies of J.G.Stauffer guitar made by B.Kresse and original instrument from the beginning of the 19th century Nikolaus G.Ries cca. 1830

In his teaching, Pavel’s approach is encouraging but subtle. For, as he says, “the teacher is not allowed to say everything. […] I let them play one piece. Each note twice, one staccato, one tenuto, to show what you can do. The possibilities: that’s what I like very much. I don’t like to write piano, forte, tenuto. I don’t like metronomes.”

Steidl is known for using overtone singing in some works, such as Domeniconi’s Hommage à Jimi Hendrix, op. 52.